It was a total joy to be your guest speaker and present Lifespan Integration Therapy to you last Monday, March 5!

I feel as though we took a nice flat stone and skimmed it along the surface of a deep wide pool. We saw a few lovely skips, and then it quickly dropped away. There is so much more surface yet untouched and still enormous depths yet to plunge! But I was so excited by your questions and your abilities to pursue those depths!

Dr. Gabor Mate, an addiction expert from Vancouver, BC said, “Every emotion has a chemical correlate.” This chemical (and corresponding electrical) energy gets trapped in neuronal bundles through trauma and can be freed through neuro-therapies. The best of these, in my opinion, is Lifespan Integration Therapy.

I believe some of you will be the researchers who can truly perceive the increased connectivity within the brain and the freedom from trauma that I see every day in my office as I use LI Therapy. I also hope that some of you will be the clinicians who continue to fine-tune the therapy and experience the thrill of bringing true healing. But I sincerely hope that all of you will pursue your own personal wholeness, because that is available to you, and the greatest healers are those who have taken their own journeys.

I tell many of my clients that I can see they are bright and full of insight about their problems, and yet they remain stuck. If effort and insight could have changed them, they’d be changed. It is clear that many people need a “change agent.” This seems to be the nature of our bodies – and we are “embodied spirits.”

I love that you are reading The Body keeps the Score by Bessel Van Der Kolk! Every passage of that book seems to correspond with my experience as a therapist.

So, whatever you do, continue to develop your wise minds and your kind hearts. The world has need of you. Thanks for letting me share. ~ Jenny

“Psychologists usually try to help people use insight and understanding to manage their behavior. However, Neuroscience research shows that very few psychological problems are the result of defects in understanding; most originate in pressures from deeper regions in the brain that drive our perception and attention. When the alarm bell of the emotional brain keeps signaling that you are in danger, no amount of insight will silence it. I am reminded of the comedy in which a seven-time recidivist in an anger-management program extols the virtue of the techniques he’s learned: “They are great and work terrific – as long as you are not “really angry.” Bessel Van Der Kolk, The Body Keeps The Score

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